Opinion: Bowling Hall of Fame needs to be more selective

There are many great bowlers in the professional bowling hall of fame. Walter Ray Williams, Jr. has 47 titles, eight majors, and was bowler of the year seven times spanning three decades. Earl Anthony won 41 titles, 10 majors, was bowler of the year six times and set the benchmark for definition of greatest bowler of all time for years. Mark Roth won 34 titles, and while he only won a single major, he influenced bowling generations to come with his power style. Pete Weber has 37 titles, 10 majors, and has consistently come through in the clutch throughout his career. Norm Duke has 37 titles, six majors, was bowler of the year twice, is the youngest to have ever won a pro tournament, has won the career grand slam, bowled a 300 game on live TV, and won three majors in one season. Mike Aulby won 29 titles and eight majors,  was the first to complete the grand slam of majors, and he also bowled a 300 game on TV. Dick Weber won 30 titles and four majors and, along with Don Carter, was a large part of bowling’s success in the early years and why the tour became popular. There are many others as well.

Recently, however, many bowlers have been inducted into the Hall, and the criteria seems to be having won 10 titles. The 10 titles appears to be the most important factor, more than major titles and more than Continue reading

Spare thoughts: The greatest telecast

Pete Weber, with the “Frantic” in hand, stepped onto the approach and took a deep breath. The 69th U.S. Open title was on the line, but for Weber, a strike would also mean his ninth major title and a record fifth Open title. Weber threw a great shot the frame before, and if the 10-pin had fallen, the title would already have been his. Instead, he picked up the spare (a spare he had missed earlier that day) and was now tasked with needing a strike on this shot to win by one pin. It had been a grueling three games up to this point, and this was it. Weber threw the ball. It looked exactly like the previous shot. Would the 10-pin fall? Yes, it did, and Weber was ecstatic.

There have been many great moments and tournaments in PBA history. Continue reading